Oct 13

Second Coming–2nd Century CE: Prophets and Prophetesses of the Montanist movement predicted that Jesus would return sometime during their lifetime and establish the New Jerusalem in the city of Pepuza in Asia Minor.

–365 CE: A man by the name of Hilary of Poitiers, announced that the end would happen that year. It didn’t.

–375 to 400 CE: Saint Martin of Tours, a student of Hilary, was convinced that the end would happen sometime before 400 CE.

–500 CE: This was the first year-with-a-nice-round-number-panic. The antipope Hippolytus and an earlier Christian academic Sextus Julius Africanus had predicted Armageddon at about this year.

–968 CE: An eclipse was interpreted as a prelude to the end of the world by the army of the German emperor Otto III.

–992: Good Friday coincided with the Feast of the Annunciation; this had long been believed to be the event that would bring forth the Antichrist, and thus the end-times events foretold in the book of Revelation. Records from Germany report that a new sun rose in the north and that as many as 3 suns and 3 moons were fighting. There does not appear to be independent verification of this remarkable event.

–1000-JAN-1: Many Christians in Europe had predicted the end of the world on this date. As the date approached, Christian armies waged war against some of the Pagan countries in Northern Europe. The motivation was to convert them all to Christianity, by force if necessary, before Christ returned in the year 1000. Meanwhile, some Christians had given their possessions to the Church in anticipation of the end. Fortunately, the level of education was so low that many citizens were unaware of the year. They did not know enough to be afraid. Otherwise, the panic might have been far worse than it was. Unfortunately, when Jesus did not appear, the church did not return the gifts. Serious criticism of the Church followed. The Church reacted by exterminating some heretics. Agitation settled down quickly.

–1000-MAY: The body of Charlemagne was disinterred on Pentecost. A legend had arisen that an emperor would rise from his sleep to fight the Antichrist.

–1005-1006: A terrible famine throughout Europe was seen as a sign of the nearness of the end.

–1033: Some believed this to be the 1000th anniversary of the death and resurrection of Jesus. His second coming was anticipated. Jesus’ actual date of execution is unknown, but is believed to be in the range of 27 to 33 CE.

–1147: Gerard of Poehlde decided that the millennium had actually started in 306 CE during Constantine’s reign. Thus, the world end was expected in 1306 CE.

–1179: John of Toledo predicted the end of the world during 1186. This estimate was based on the alignment of many planets.

–1205: Joachim of Fiore predicted in 1190 that the Antichrist was already in the world, and that King Richard of England would defeat him. The Millennium would then begin, sometime before 1205.

–1284: Pope Innocent III computed this date by adding 666 years onto the date the Islam was founded.

–1346 and later: The black plague spread across Europe, killing one third of the population. This was seen as the prelude to an immediate end of the world. Unfortunately, the Christians had previously killed a many of the cats, fearing that they might be familiars of Witches. The fewer the cats, the more the rats. It was the rat fleas that spread the black plague.

–1496: This was approximately 1500 years after the birth of Jesus. Some mystics in the 15th century predicted that the millennium would begin during this year.

–1524: Many astrologers predicted the imminent end of the world due to a world wide flood. They obviously had not read the Genesis story of the rainbow.

–1533: Melchior Hoffman predicted that Jesus’ return would happen a millennium and a half after the nominal date of his execution, in 1533. The New Jerusalem was expected to be established in Strasbourg, Germany. He was arrested and died in a Strasbourg jail.
bullet 1669: The Old Believers in Russia believed that the end of the world would occur in this year. 20 thousand burned themselves to death between 1669 and 1690 to protect themselves from the Antichrist.

–1689: Benjamin Keach, a 17th century Baptist, predicted the end of the world for this year.

–1736: British theologian and mathematician William Whitson predicted a great flood similar to Noah’s for OCT-13 of this year.

–1792: This was the date of the end of the world calculated by some believers in the Shaker movement.

–1830: Margaret McDonald, a Christian prophetess, predicted that Robert Owen would be the Antichrist. Owen helped found New Harmony, IN.

–1843-MAR-21: William Miller, founder of the Millerite movement, predicted that Jesus would come on this date. A very large number of Christians accepted his prophecy.

–1844-OCT-22: When Jesus did not return, Miller predicted this new date. In an event which is now called “The Great Disappointment,” many Christians sold their property and possessions, quit their jobs and prepared themselves for the second coming. Nothing happened; the day came and went without incident.

–1850: Ellen White, founder of the Seven Day Adventists movement, made many predictions of the timing of the end of the world. All failed. On 1850-JUN-27 she prophesized that only a few months remained before the end. She wrote: “My accompanying angel said, ‘Time is almost finished. Get ready, get ready, get ready.’ …now time is almost finished…and what we have been years learning, they will have to learn in a few months.” 10
bullet 1856 or later: At Ellen White’s last prediction, she said that she was shown in a vision the fate of believers who attended the 1856 SDA conference. She wrote “I was shown the company present at the Conference. Said the angel: ‘Some food for worms, some subjects of the seven last plagues, some will be alive and remain upon the earth to be translated at the coming of Jesus.” 11 That is, some of the attendees would die of normal diseases; some would die from plagues at the last days, others would still be alive when Jesus came. “By the early 1900s all those who attended the conference had passed away, leaving the Church with the dilemma of trying to figure out how to explain away such a prominent prophetic failure.” 12

–1891: Mother Shipton, a 16th century mystic predicted the end of the world: “…The world to an end shall come; in eighteen hundred and eighty-one.”

–1891 or before: On 1835-FEB-14, Joseph Smith, the founder of the Mormon church, attended a meeting of church leaders. He said that the meeting had been called because God had commanded it. He announced that Jesus would return within 56 years — i.e. before 1891-FEB-15. (History of the Church 2:182)

–1914 was one of the more important estimates of the start of the war of Armageddon by the Jehovah’s Witnesses (Watchtower Bible and Tract Society). They based their prophecy of 1914 from prophecy in the book of Daniel, Chapter 4. The writings referred to “seven times”. The WTS interpreted each “time” as equal to 360 days, giving a total of 2520 days. This was further interpreted as representing 2520 years, measured from the starting date of 607 BCE. This gave 1914 as the target date. When 1914 passed, they changed their prediction; 1914 became the year that Jesus invisibly began his rule.

–1925. Watchtower magazine predicted: “The year 1925 is a date definitely and clearly marked in the Scriptures, even more clearly than that of 1914; but it would be presumptuous on the part of any faithful follower of the Lord to assume just what the Lord is going to do during that year.”

–1919: Meteorologist Albert Porta predicted that the conjunction of 6 planets would generate a magnetic current that would cause the sun to explode and engulf the earth on DEC-17.

–1936: Herbert W Armstrong, founder of the Worldwide Church of God, predicted that the Day of the Lord would happen sometime in 1936. Nothing much happened that year, except for the birth of the compiler of this list — who has been referred to as an Anti-Christ. When the prediction failed, he made a new estimate: 1975.

–1940 or 1941: A Bible teacher from Australia, Leonard Sale-Harrison, held a series of prophesy conferences across North America in the 1930’s. He predicted that the end of the world would happen in 1940 or 1941. 7

–1948: During this year, the state of Israel was founded. Some Christians believed that this event was the final prerequisite for the second coming of Jesus. Various end of the world predictions were made in the range 1888 to 2048.

–1953-AUG: David Davidson wrote a book titled “The Great Pyramid, Its Divine Message”. In it, he predicted that the world would end in 1953-AUG.

–1957-APR: The Watchtower magazine quoted 6 a pastor from California, Mihran Ask, as saying in 1957-JAN that “Sometime between April 16 and 23, 1957, Armageddon will sweep the world! Millions of persons will perish in its flames and the land will be scorched.’

–1959: Florence Houteff’s, who was the leader of the Branch Davidians faith group, prophesied that the 1260 days mentioned in Revelation 11:3 would end and the Kingdom of David would be established on 1959-APR-22. Followers expected to die, be resurrected, and transferred to Heaven. Many sold their possessions and moved to Mt. Carmel in anticipation of the “end time”. It didn’t happen. The group almost did not survive; only a few dozen members remained.

Most Branch Davidians did die on 1993-APR-29 as a result of arson apparently ordered by their leader, David Koresh. They were not bodily resurrected — on earth at least.

–1960: Piazzi Smyth, a past astronomer royal of Scotland, wrote a book circa 1860 titled “Our Inheritance in the Great Pyramid.” It was responsible for spreading the belief in pyramidology throughout the world. This is the belief that secrets are hidden in the dimensions of the great pyramids. He concluded from his research that the millennium would start before the end of 1960 CE.

–1967: During the six day war, the Israeli army captured all of Jerusalem. Many conservative Christians believed that the rapture would occur quickly. However, the final Biblical prerequisite for the second coming is that the Jews resume ritual animal sacrifices in the temple at Jerusalem. That never happened.

–1970’s: The late Moses David (formerly David Berg) was the founder of the Christian religious group, The Children of God. He predicted that a comet would hit the earth, probably in the mid 1970’s and destroy all life in the United States. One source indicated that he believed it would happen in 1973.

–1972: According to an article in the Atlantic magazine, “Herbert W. Armstrong’s empire suffered a serious blow when the end failed to begin in January of 1972, as Armstrong had predicted, thus bringing hardship to many people who had given most of their assets to the church in the expectation of going to Petra, where such worldly possessions would be useless.”

–1974: Charles Meade, a pastor in Daleville, IN, predicted that the end of the world will happen during his lifetime. He was born circa 1927, so the end will probably come early in the 21st century.

–1975: Many Jehovah’s Witness predicted this date. However, it was not officially recognized by the leadership.

–1978: Chuck Smith, Pastor of Calvary Chapel in Cost Mesa, CA, predicted the rapture in 1981.

–1980: Leland Jensen leader of a Baha’i Faith group, predicted that a nuclear disaster would happen in 1980. This would be followed by two decades of conflict, ending in the establishment of God’s Kingdom on earth.

–1981: Arnold Murray of the Shepherd’s Chapel taught an anti-Trinitarian belief about God, and Christian Identity. Back in the 1970’s, he predicted that the Antichrist would appear before 1981.
bullet Rev. Sun Myung Moon, founder of the Unification Church predicted that the Kingdom of Heaven would be established this year.

–1982: Pat Robertson predicted a few years in advance that the world would end in the fall of 1982. The failure of this prophecy did not seem to adversely affect his reputation.

–1982: Astronomers John Gribben & Setphen Plagemann predicted the “Jupiter Effect” in 1974. They wrote that when various planets were aligned on the same side of the sun, tidal forces would create solar flares, radio interruptions, rainfall and temperature disturbances and massive earthquakes. The planets did align as seen from earth, as they do regularly. Nothing unusual happened.

–1984 to 1999: In 1983, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, later called Osho, teacher of what has been called the Rajneesh movement, is said to have predicted massive destruction on earth, including natural disasters and man-made catastrophes. Floods larger than any since Noah, extreme earthquakes, very destructive volcano eruptions, nuclear wars etc. were to happen. Tokyo, New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Bombay will all disappear. Actually, the predictions were read out by his secretary; their legitimacy is doubtful.

–1985: Arnold Murray of the Shepherd’s Chapel predicted that the war of Armageddon will start on 1985-JUN 8-9 in “a valley of the Alaskan peninsula.”

–1986: Moses David of The Children of God faith group predicted that the Battle of Armageddon would take place in 1986. Russia would defeat Israel and the United States. A worldwide Communist dictatorship would be established. In 1993, Christ would return to earth.

–1987 to 2000: Lester Sumrall, in his 1987 book “I Predict 2000 AD” predicted that Jerusalem would be the richest city on Earth, that the Common Market would rule Europe, and that there would be a nuclear war involving Russia and perhaps the U.S. Also, he prophesized that the greatest Christian revival in the history of the church would happen: all during the last 13 years of the 20th century. All of the predictions failed.

–1988: Hal Lindsey had predicted in his book “The Late, Great Planet Earth” that the Rapture was coming in 1988 – one generation or 40 years after the creation of the state of Israel. This failed prophecy did not appear to damage his reputation. He continues to write books of prophecy which sell very well indeed.

–1988: Alfred Schmielewsky, a psychic whose stage name was “super-psychic A.S. Narayana,” predicted in 1986 that the world’s greatest natural disaster would hit Montreal in 1988. Sadly, his psychic abilities failed him on 1999-APR-11 when he answered the door of his home only to be shot dead by a gunman.

–1988-MAY: A 1981 movie titled “The man who saw tomorrow” described some of Nostradamus predictions. Massive earthquakes were predicted for San Francisco and Los Angeles.

–1988-OCT-11: Edgar Whisenaut, a NASA scientist, had published the book “88 Reasons why the Rapture will Occur in 1988.” It sold over 4 million copies.

–1990: Peter Ruckman concluded from his analysis of the Bible that the rapture would come within a few years of 1990.

The above information is taken from 63 failed & 1 ambiguous end-of-the-world predictions between 30 CE and 1990 CE.

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11 Responses to “Failed End Of The World Predictions”

  1. 1. Jean Says:

    Informative comments, thanks. Interestingly, similar names are discussed in a very blunt way in the article Pretrib Rapture Dishonesty – and the same names would love to ban it in an Obama-like way!

    If you are for freedom of speech, you will definitely be moved by it. BTW, I don’t care for date-setters! Jean

    [Editor: edited and link added.]

  2. 2. Jake Wolfe Says:

    Add to this the false tact of Dick Fehr for the year 1984 and later the year 2005.

  3. 3. Bob Mutch Says:

    Hi Jake,

    Who are you referring to for 1984 and 2005?

    I Googled up Dick Fehr and found nothing about him for 1984 or 2005.

    Thanks!

    Bob.

  4. 4. Bob Mutch Says:

    Hi Jean,

    I didn’t get you meaning of “ban it in an Obama-like way”?

    I think date setting for the end of the world is foolishness and those that do it are out of touch with Christ. Not as bad as those that pull dates out of the Bible for there sects to start but but just about.

    Thanks!

    Bob.

  5. 5. Jake Wolfe Says:

    Hi Bob My Father inlaw had something go in 1976 that the return of christ was 1984 but when this didn’t happen he lay low till 1989 1990 he work out his next return would be 2005 will guess what now he dose not what talk about it.

  6. 6. Bob Mutch Says:

    Hi Jake,

    Sorry to hear about that. I guess to some degree people are a product of there environment. There have been lots of false teachers making mad money on end time books.

    The Dispensationalist Premillennialists view, which is the most widly accepted view, is really just a second chance theory.

    The left behind teaching and their authors teach a second chance to get saved during the supposed “7-year-tribulation” after the second coming of Christ.

    If the amills or even the Historic Premillennialism are right, when Jesus comes back it is all over and the Dispensationalist Premillennialists teaching and its authors have offered a second change to the unsaved where these is no second chance.

    According to the second chancers LaHaye and Jenkins to take part in this supposed second chance you will need to go through 7 years of Protestant Purgatory.

  7. 7. Jake Wolfe Says:

    Hi Bob,

    My father inlaw didn’t do it for money. He did on historical back ground on the Bible and beliefed that all the from Mat to Rev had be full fill yet. Even when I could prove him wrong he went after my family. O well back to false perdictions. If there was a second chance that would mead that Jesus is setting foot on earth again but Bible doesn’t teach that.

  8. 8. Allan Svensson Says:

    Hi.
    I found your Web Site by Google and I wish you the best you can get, the peace of God through Jesus Christ.

    [Editor: Unrelevant links and content have been removed.]

  9. 9. Larry Says:

    Miss Macdonald’s “Vision” Located!

    Visit Joe Ortiz’s “End Times Passover” blog (Mar. 9th) to see a rare 19th century “rapture” document found in the famous British Library in England. The document is listed in that library’s catalogue as “Margaret Macdonald’s Vision,” and you will see a facsimile of the handwritten account of her discovery of a pretribulation rapture in the Bible – the first instance of such teaching (1830) and this facsimile is the first time any portion of her history-changing “revelation” has ever been aired.
    And Southern California media personality Joe Ortiz is honored to be the very first person to ever air this document associated with the young Scottish lassie who is now a household name.
    Some other Google articles related to Margaret Macdonald are “Pretrib Rapture Diehards,” X-Raying Margaret,” “Edward Irving is Unnerving,” “Thomas Ice (Bloopers),” “Pretrib Rapture Secrecy,” and “Pretrib Rapture Dishonesty.

  10. 10. Paul Says:

    Judgement Day, Saturday, May 21, 2011
    http://www.wecanknow.com/gallery.php

    Camping is not hedging this time: “Beyond the shadow of a doubt, May 21 will be the date of the Rapture and the day of judgment,” he said in January.
    http://www.houmatoday.com/article/20110518/wire/110519431?p=2&tc=pg

    You can add this on Sunday….

  11. 11. ANON Says:

    It’s May 21 here in our country and 6:00 PM (the exact time that the judgment will take place) had just passed and nothing happened.

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